Adjunct Teaching

Presentation at Villanova University (Courtesy of Villanova University).

Click on the  image above to view the presentation at Villanova University (Courtesy of Villanova University).

Villanova University, Center for Arab & Islamic Studies
Course Title:  American Muslims:  Race or Religion?
Adjunct Professor (January 2014 – May 2014)

Taught a three-credit course I designed which studied legal consequences of American Muslim identity, particularly in the context of post-9/11 domestic counterterrorism policies. This course also studied American Muslim identity through the context of popular culture, mass media, American legal history, and American socio-political history.

Temple University Beasley School of Law
Course Title:  Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity Law
Adjunct Clinical Professor of Law (January 2009 – September 2011)

I adjunct taught a clinical course titled Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity Law for five (5) semesters.  This course required students to work on-site, for 10 hours/week, at an LGBT-rights nonprofit organization for which I was the legal director and the director supervisor for all law students, attorneys, and staff who operated within the legal department.  All clinical courses also required a classroom component, included within the 10 hours/week.  For my course, this classroom component consisted of a weekly 2 hours class which alternated between biweekly “case rounds” during which students reviewed and discussed their assigned cases and a biweekly class (led by me) on substantive issues of Pennsylvania LGBT law.  Though I did not create this course, I did revise a pre-existing course description and create new syllabi for each semester.

Amara mentors students from Rutgers School of Law-Camden. Image taken from Rutgers-Camden publication. Click HERE for full article. https://wlc.camlaw.rutgers.edu/sites/camlaw/files/SUMMER_2011_sm.pdf

Amara mentors students from Rutgers School of Law-Camden. Image taken from Rutgers-Camden publication. Click HERE for full article.

RutgersSchool of Law-Camden 
Course Title:  Advanced Legal Writing: Community-Based Practice
(Lead Faculty:  Clinical Associate Professor  Jason K. Cohen)
Supervising Attorney (Spring 2010 & Spring 2011)

For this course, an in-house Rutgers-Camden legal research and writing faculty member assigned students research and writing projects which addressing the legal issues raised in the ongoing work of the legal services practice for which I served as legal director.

Rutgers School of Law-Camden 
Course Title:  Legal Analysis, Writing & Research (Clinical Associate Professor  Jason K. Cohen)
Guest Lecturer (Spring 2009) | Moot Court Judge (Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011)

Served as a guest lecturer to discussthe legal case Prowell v. Wise Business Forms, Inc., 579 F.3d 285 (3d Cir. 2009), a case in which the plaintiff was being represented, through outside pro bono counsel, by the organization which I then served as legal director.  At the time of the lecture, the Third Circuit had not yet rendered its precedential decision in a case which discussed “sex stereotyping” as a form of unlawful discrimination “because of. . . sex” pursuant to Title VII. More specifically, this case involved a male employee who suffered workplace discrimination due both to his actual or perceived sexual orientation and to his failure to conform to traditional male sex stereotypes. My lecture focused on the evidence relating to each form of discrimination and discussed what constitutes “sex stereotyping.”

Amara poses with law students outside Mazzoni Center Legal Services. Image taken from Rutgers-Camden publication. Click HERE for full article. https://wlc.camlaw.rutgers.edu/sites/camlaw/files/SUMMER_2011_sm.pdf )

Amara poses with law students outside Mazzoni Center Legal Services. Image taken from Rutgers-Camden publication. Click HERE for full article.

University of Pennsylvania Law School
Externship supervisor (Spring 2009) | Pro bono placement supervisor (January 2009 – September 2011)
Course Title:  Ad Hoc Externship

During the Spring 2009 semester, I supervised one PennLaw student who received course credit (as an “Ad Hoc Externship”) for the time she spent at the legal services nonprofit which I then served as legal director, and this student was required to adhere to the same course requirements as the students I supervised through the Temple Law School clinical course (10 hours/week on-site, including 2-hour weekly class).  In subsequent semesters, Penn law students came to perform their pro bono service (required for Penn Law graduation), but these students did not receive course credit, worked a minimum number of hours per week, and did not attend the weekly class.